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School Climate Transformation Grant » Positive Behavior Support

Positive Behavior Support

What is PBIS?

Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is an evidence-based three-tiered framework for improving and integrating all of the data, systems, and practices affecting student outcomes every day. It is a way to support everyone – especially students with disabilities – to create the kinds of schools where all students are successful.

 

PBIS Components

 

PBIS isn’t a curriculum you purchase or something you learn during a one-day professional development training. It is a commitment to addressing student behavior through systems change. When it’s implemented well, students achieve improved social and academic outcomes, school experience reduced exclusionary discipline practices, and school personnel feel more effective.

 

At its foundation, PBIS is a framework supported by research spanning decades. Study after study confirms the positive impact these tiered systems and practices have on improving student outcomes.

 

 

What is a three-tiered framework?

PBIS is a three-tiered framework and each tier aligns to the type of support students need. Schools apply this model as a way to align to academic, behavioral, social and emotional supports to improve education for all students. It’s important to remember these tiers refer to levels of support students receive, not to students themselves. Students receive Tier 2 supports, they are not Tier 2 students.

 

Tier 1: Universal Prevention (ALL)

Tier 1 supports serve as the foundation for behavior and academics. Schools provide these universal supports to all students. For most students, the core program gives them what they need to be successful and to prevent future problems.

 

Tier 2: Targeted Prevention (SOME)

This level of support focuses on improving specific skill deficits students have. Schools often provide Tier 2 supports to groups of students with similar targeted needs. Providing support to a group of students provides more opportunities for practice and feedback while keeping the intervention maximally efficient. Students may need some assessment to identify whether they need this level of support and which skills to address. Tier 2 supports help students develop the skills they need to benefit core programs at the school.

 

Tier 3: Intensive, Individualized Prevention (FEW)

Tier 3 supports are the most intensive supports the school offers. These supports are the most resource-intensive due to the individualized approach of developing and carrying out interventions. At this level, schools typically rely on formal assessments to determine a student’s need and to develop an individualized support plan. Student plans often include goals related to both academics as well as behavior support.

 

Three-Tier Model PBIS

 

 

What are things I should expect to see my school doing when they implement PBIS?

When schools implement PBIS, they:

  •     Regularly check the effectiveness of their practices
  •     Pull from a continuum of evidence-based interventions to support student needs
  •     Develop content expertise through coaching and ongoing professional development
  •     Rely on teams to guide implementation
  •     Use data to monitor student progress
  •     Implement universal screening practices
  •     Include community members and families to create culturally-relevant practices

 

SOURCES: https://www.pbis.org/pbis/getting-started and https://www.pbis.org/pbis/tiered-framework

 

 

How can I implement PBIS at home during distance learning?

  •     Set routines
 

Elementary Routine Example

 

Secondary Routine Example

 

Get Ready to Learn

Wake up, get ready for the day, & eat breakfast

Get Ready to Learn

Wake up, get ready for the day, & eat breakfast

Morning Check-In

Review morning schedule & expectations. Check-in (How are you doing today? Do you have any questions?)

Morning Check-In

Together set schedule & expectations. Check-in (How are you doing today? Do you have any questions?)

Morning Movement

Consider a walk outside, yoga, “hike” inside on the stairs, etc.

Morning Exercise

Choose an exercise activity to do in the home or outdoors

Structured Learning

Establish times for core academic activities, like reading, math, writing

Morning Distance Learning

Support the student in engaging in distance or remote learning activities

Lunch Check-In

Eat healthy lunch, review afternoon schedule & expectations. Check-in (How are you doing? Do you have any questions?)

Lunch Check-In

Eat healthy lunch, review afternoon schedule & expectations. Check-in (How are you doing? Do you have any questions?)

Afternoon Learning Activities

Consider a virtual field trip, art, music, science or other fun learning activity

Afternoon Distance Learning

Support the student in re-engaging in distance or remote learning activities

Afternoon Movement

Consider a walk, dance party, or similar active movement options

Afternoon Exercise

Choose an activity to do in the home or outdoors

Social Connection

Connect with family members or friends via social media, phone, etc.

Social Connection

Connect with family members or friends via social media, phone, etc.

Evening Family Time & Bedtime

Maintain typical evening routines to connect with each other

Evening Family Time & Bedtime

Maintain typical evening routines to connect with each other

 
  •     Set home expectations

 

School Example

Classroom

Cafeteria

Dismissal

Be Respectful

Raise your hand before speaking

Throw your food way when done eating

Listen to teacher instructions

Be Responsible

Turn in your homework when it is due

Bring your lunch money to lunch

Have your backpack ready

Be Safe

Walk when holding scissors

Keep feet on the floor

Walk in the hallways

 

 

Home Example

Virtual Classroom

Mealtime

Bedtime

Be Respectful

Keep background noise to a minimum when engaged in a lesson

Be kind to family members during conversation

Put your dishes in the sink

Be polite when reminded about bedtime

Be Responsible

Do your best work

Turn in your homework when it is due

Wash your hands before helping with meal preparation and/or eating

Go to bed on time

Be Safe

Keep open drink away from computer keyboard

Keep feet on the floor

Wash your hands before brushing your teeth

 

  •     Teach, remind and reward expected behaviors with positive feedback
 

 

Be Respectful

Example: Kind Language

Be Responsible

Example: Do Your Best Work

Be Safe

Example: Wash Hands

Teach

Describe what kind language does (and does not) sound like in your home. Demonstrate kind language and ask children to practice kind language with you.

Describe what “doing your best” means in your home. Examples might include focusing on your work, reading/listening to all instructions before beginning, asking for help when needed, and sticking with it until done. Discuss what this looks like (and does not look like) across the types of learning activities.

 

Describe and demonstrate how to wash hands (using various posters available from CDC). To ensure your children was their hands for 20-30 seconds, have them pick a portion of a favorite song to sing.

Remind

At the start of the day and each new activity where kind language is expected, remind kids to be kind. For example, “Playing games together is fun, and let’s remember to be kind with our words.”

 

At the start of the day and at the beginning of new or difficult activities, remind children to “do their best work.”

Before meal preparation, before eating, after using the bathroom, or after touching their face, remind children to wash their hands.

Reward with Positive Feedback

When your child is kind, provide specific praise. For example, “Thank you for being kind when your sibling was having a hard time.

When you see your child doing their best, provide specific praise. “It’s great to see you doing your best! I think you’ll be proud of your work!”

 

When you see your child washing their hands, provide specific praise – for example, “Awesome handwashing! Thanks for keeping our family safe.”

 

  •     Learn the facts about the current events and the system’s response
    •     Highlight the steps your family, school and district are taking to keep students, families and staff safe during this time.
  •     Communicate with schools for instructional guidance
  •     Model and promote emotional wellness

 

SOURCE: Supporting Families with PBIS at Home

 

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