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Student Services » Health Services

Health Services

Student Immunization/ Health (All Grade Levels)

Immunization requirements are administered by the State of Texas and are subject to change.  To maintain a healthy atmosphere on our campus Vanguard Academy and the State of Texas require all students to maintain current health records. Except as provided by the TEC, Section 38.001, a student is required to be fully immunized against certain diseases. However, our school may admit a student provisionally if the student has begun the required immunizations and continues to receive the necessary immunizations as rapidly as medically feasible.  Except as provided by the TEC, Section 38.001, a student who is not fully immunized and has not begun the required immunization may not attend school. If a student should not be immunized for medical reasons, the student or parent must present a certificate signed by a U.S. registered and licensed physician stating that, in the doctor’s opinion, the immunization required is medically contraindicated or poses a significant risk to the health and well-being of the student or a member of the student’s family or household. This certificate must be renewed yearly unless the physician specifies a lifelong condition. A homeless student may be admitted for 30 days pending initiation of vaccinations or receipt of vaccination documentation.

A student who is a military dependent or any student transferring from another Texas school district may be enrolled for 30 days pending transfer of immunization records. Persons who knowingly falsify student enrollment information are in violation of the law and are subject to prosecution.

 

 

Student Health

When a student becomes ill, he/she will be sent to the school nurse. When a student has a fever or is in need of further care, a parent/guardian will be contacted. If the parent/guardian cannot be reached, the emergency contacts on the enrollment form will be notified. Students cannot leave campus unless a parent/guardian or emergency contact has been notified. The school nurse will also dispense medication to students, as prescribed by a doctor and directed by parent/guardian. Any medicines must be in their original containers.

Prescribed medicines must be labeled with the student’s name, dosage, physician’s name, pharmacy, and date filled. All medicines are to be brought to the school nurse upon arrival to school, accompanied by a note from the parent/guardian requesting administration.

Vanguard Academy performs the state required screening vision, hearing, acanthosis and spinal screenings on your child during the school year. Parents will be notified of the results of the screening only if medical follow-up is necessary. This screening procedure does not replace your child’s need for regular health care and check-ups.

 

Emergency Medical Treatment

In case of serious illness or accident, we will contact you or the person you designate on the Emergency Card by phone so your child can be picked up. If the situation is life threatening, an ambulance will be called. Vanguard Academy does not pay for illness or accidents that occur while your child is at school. IMPORTANT- Please complete and return the “Student Emergency Record” so we can reach you in case of an emergency. Don’t forget to call the front office to let us know if your phone number changes.

 

Medication

Only the school nurse, principal and/or assigned employee may administer medication to a student who must take medication during the school day. Prescription medications must be properly labeled and in the original container. Medications will only be given according to the instructions on the label. A Parental/ Guardian Permission Form for Administrating Medications at school must be filled out and signed by the parent/ guardian at the nurse’s office/ front office. We are not allowed to give prescription medications labeled with one student’s name to any other student, even a brother or sister. Medication will not be


administered without proper documentation. Medication that your child needs during the school year can usually be given at home such as:

 

  • Once a day – before or after
  • Twice a day- before school and in the
  • Three times a day – before school, after school, and at bed

 

NO over the counter, samples, herbal products, dietary supplements or medications from another country will be administered at school. Students may not have ANY medications with them during school hours. Unapproved medications will be confiscated. It is the parents/guardians responsibility to pick up medications kept at school throughout the school year. Medications not picked up will be disposed of after the students are dismissed for the school year.

 

Communicable Diseases

The school requests that parents/guardians of students with a communicable or contagious disease inform the school so that other students who have been exposed to the disease can be alerted. A student with a communicable disease is not allowed to come to school while the disease is contagious.

 

These diseases include but are not limited to chicken pox, measles, mumps, strep throat, scarlet fever, hepatitis, H1N1 and mononucleosis. Most communicable diseases require a doctor’s release for the student to return to the classroom. To protect others from getting sick, do not send your child to school with the following conditions:

Fever of 1000 F or greater, continued vomiting, diarrhea, “pink eye,” head lice or overdue immunizations. Children with these or any other suspected contagious conditions will be sent home.

 

Bacterial Meningitis

State law specifically requires that district provide the following information:

 

What is Meningitis?

Meningitis is an inflammation of the covering of the brain and spinal cord. Viruses, parasites, fungi, and bacteria can cause it. Viral meningitis is most common and the least serious. Bacterial meningitis is the most common form of serious bacterial infection with the potential for serious, long-term complications. It is an uncommon disease, but requires urgent treatment with antibiotics to prevent permanent damage or death.

What are the Symptoms?

Someone with meningitis will become very ill. The illness may develop over one or two days, but it can also rapidly progress in a matter of hours. Not everyone with meningitis will have the same symptoms. Children (over one year old) and adults with meningitis may have a severe headache, high temperature, vomiting, sensitivity to bright lights, neck stiffness or joint pains, and drowsiness or confusion. In both children and adults, there may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots. These can occur anywhere on the body. The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is based on a combination of symptoms and laboratory results.

How serious is bacterial meningitis?

If it is diagnosed early and treated promptly, the majority of people make a complete recovery. In some cases it can be fatal or a person may be left with permanent disability.

 

How is bacterial meningitis spread?

Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause meningitis are contagious as diseases like the common cold or the flu, and they are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. The germs live naturally in the back of our noses and throats, but they do not live


for long outside the body. They are spread when people exchange saliva (such as by kissing, sharing drinking containers, utensils, or cigarettes).

The germ does not cause meningitis in most people. Instead, most people become carriers of the germ for days, weeks, or even months. The bacteria rarely overcome the body’s immune system and cause meningitis or another serious illness.

How can bacterial meningitis be prevented?

Do not share food, drinks, utensils, toothbrushes, or cigarettes. Limit the number of persons you kiss. While there are vaccines for some other strains of bacterial meningitis, they are used only in special circumstance. These include when there is a disease outbreak in a community or for people traveling to a country where there is a high risk of getting the disease. Also, a vaccine is recommended by some groups for college students, particularly freshmen living in dorms or residence halls. The vaccine is safe and effective (85 – 90 percent). It can cause mild side effects, such as redness and pain at the injection site lasting up to two days.  Immunity develops within seven to ten days after the vaccine is given and lasts for up to five years. What should you do if you think you or a friend might have bacterial meningitis?

You should seek prompt medical attention.

Where can you get more information?

Your school nurse, family doctor, and the staff at your local or regional health department office are excellent sources for information on all communicable diseases. You may also call your local health department meningococcal vaccine. Additional information may also be found at the Web sites for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

http: //www.cdc.gov/ and the Texas Department of Health http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/

 

Head Lice

In accordance with Senate Bill 1566, the school nurse will notify parents within 5 days of discovering a fellow student in their child’s classroom has head lice. The child with head lice will not be identified. If their own child is discovered to have head lice, parents will be notified within 48 hours. The school nurse will also provide information to parents on how to treat and prevent head lice, in accordance with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

School Health Advisory Council (SHAC)

During the preceding school year, the district’s School Health Advisory Council holds three meetings. Additional information regarding the district’s School Health Advisory Council is available from the Cafeteria Managers at each campus.

 

Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA)

In 1986, Congress passes the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) which requires schools to be inspected or identify any asbestos containing building materials. The law further requires an asbestos management plan to be in place by July 1989. Vanguard Academy developed a plan, as required, which has been continually updated. All district buildings; contain “no asbestos containing building materials.” It is the intention of Vanguard Academy to comply with all federal and state regulations controlling asbestos and to take whatever steps are necessary to ensure students and employees a healthy and safe environment in which to learn and work. You are welcomed to review a copy of the asbestos management plan at each respective campus or central administrative office during regular business hours. Juan Garcia is our designated asbestos program coordinator, and all inquiries regarding the asbestos plan and asbestos-related issues should be directed to him at (956) 781-1701.

 

Immunization Records- A student is required to be fully immunized against certain diseases. The district may admit a student provisionally if the student has begun the required immunizations and continues to receive the necessary immunizations as rapidly as medically feasible. A student who is not fully immunized and has not begun the required immunization must not attend school. A homeless student may be admitted for 30 days pending initiation of vaccinations or receipt of vaccination documentation. A student who is a military dependent or any student coming from another Texas school may be enrolled for 30 days pending transfer of immunization records. For more information visit the web page: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/immunize/school/default.shtm.